Monday, April 2, 2012

The Dirt: spring planting and diy tomato cages

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I’ve mentioned here before that my neighbor generously gives us fresh produce from his garden every year. Vine ripened tomatoes, bell peppers in assorted colors, fresh zucchini, beans and more.



Once you’ve been spoiled with home grown produce it’s hard to go back to store bought vegetables. I’ve also always put off growing my own vegetables because bags of my neighbor’s harvest would show up on my doorstep.




Sadly, my neighbor is quite elderly and his health is failing. It’s hard to see him so frail and I’m sure he won’t be able to tend to his garden this year.




So for the first time in a long time, I'm planting my own small vegetable garden. I’m growing the tomatoes in pots but I couldn’t find a tomato cage that worked. Plus, why spend money on a flimsy green cage when you can make your own.




The cage looks pretty primitive but I think it will work. I started with four bamboo stakes and used sticks that I had for the cross bars. A dab of hot glue kept them in place while I secured them with twine. 




I made some plant markers out of a paint stick and small resin alphabet tiles. This tomato plant is called Better Bush Hybrid but I didn’t have enough tiles to spell that out. I had just enough tiles to spell out "Bush" and "Roma".




I’m anxious to see how my tomatoes do. Next up for my garden – fresh herbs. I have a nice galvanized tub that I plan to use. I’ll keep you posted on the harvest.

 Thanks for visiting.

 Carolyn


I happily link at the parties listed here and 

UndertheTableandDreaming Tip Junkie handmade projects Photobucket    

26 comments:

  1. Oh nice, I wished I had a garden or balcony where I can plant tomatoes like yours. But I made a little herb storage rack, to have a little bit green in my flat

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  2. Next term my son has joined the Garden Club so I'm hoping that he learns a few things so that when they finish building our house he'll show me everything he's learnt and I'll be able to grow my own veggies. Thanks for sharing.

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  3. These look great! I like them a gazillion times better than the metal cages. Warning: if you have a lot of squirrels, they will eat your tomoatoes. And it seems like the fewer plants you have, the more they eat them. I don't know the biological science behind it, just know that it's happened to me!

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  4. Great idea to make the tomato cage out of sticks. We definitely have plenty of those around our yard. I never seem to be able to get the wire plant cage to sit in the soil right anyways and when the tomatoes really start to grow I have problems with the cage wanting to tip over. So simple, wish I would have thought about that!

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  5. These are as beautiful as they are practical! Thanks for sharing such a great idea!

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  6. Looks great Carolyn, now you've inspired me to try some tomotos in pots this year! Thanks so much for sharing on Craft schooling Sunday!

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  7. Oh, what a great idea! My husband will definitely like the branch cage, but I'm eying up those creative markers.They made me think of Scrabble. Maybe I'll get lucky and find a few Scrabble games at a yard sale or two this weekend. Too fun! Anyway, I'd love it if you would consider sharing this post on my blog's new link-up. It would fit in perfectly with my urban homesteading theme. http://littlefarminthebigcity.blogspot.com/2012/04/homestead-helps-wednesday-homestead-hop.html

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  8. This is a really pretty DIY project. I like the cages. Maybe now you can bring produce to your neighbor.

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  9. LOVE LOVE LOVE this...I'm going to have to show this to my son who is a boy scout. He can practice his lashings and make these for me!

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  10. I really should plant something this year. My green thumb is non-existent, but I love home grown veggies.

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  11. I am all for making something if I can instead of buying. I saw your picture via Homestead Helps first party- and had to click on it.
    Couple of things-- we have a neighbor who just passed in January-- The first sign that he was sick was when we noticed his garden going down hill last summer. At first we thought it was the same as ours...grasshoppers and drought combination. Anyway-- he will be missed. It is strange driving by his place and seeing it all grown up--

    back to your tomato cages. They look great. I like the fact that you made them and that they look rustic! No out of pocket.
    Hope your tomato harvest is abundant and you can share with your neighbor!

    -Pat

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  12. Carolyn, you have managed to make a tomato cage a work of art!! These look amazing! Thank you so much for linking up, featuring these on our facebook page today! Happy Easter!

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  13. Hello Carolyn,
    I love the natural look of your tomato cages. Yes, I agree that home grown produce is just the best. Thanks for sharing the DIY information.
    Smiles, Paula

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  14. This is such a pretty tomato cage. I really need to create one for my home this season. I would love for you to stop by and link up at my linky party via: http://ourdelightfulhome.blogspot.com/2012/04/show-me-what-you-got-linky-party-9.html

    Mrs. Delightful
    www.ourdelightfulhome.blogspot.com

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  15. I bet your neighbor would love it if you shared your produce with him, or helped him with his plants. I sure like when others help or share with me now that I am a 'grandma'...we miss our daily little hugs and I love yous.

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  16. AMAZING--although you already knew that. Just wanted to let you know I featured you on Sew Woodsy! Thanks for linking up!

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  17. LOVE this! I'm just starting a garden this year. I will be checking back for more tips!

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  18. Your DIY tomato cages are SO gorgeous, Carolyn. You gave me a great idea for revamping some that I already have. Thanks so much!

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  19. What a great project for spring! :) I've featured this post on Craft Gossip here:
    http://homeandgarden.craftgossip.com/6-creative-gardening-projects/

    If you would like a "featured by" button, you can grab one here:
    http://homeandgarden.craftgossip.com/grab-a-craft-gossip-button/

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  20. I really love this idea! It looks super cool!
    xo Becca

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  21. great idea. these would look good on someone's balcony that cannot have a full garden. You can make the cages as big or small as you need them. I will have to be on a good hunt for some sticks sense where I am at we do not have any trees in my yard. Camp grounds are great places to pick up small sticks specially on walking trails. Oh I can see a vine growing on the wood tomato cages. Look really good. The possibilities are endless to what you can use these for, or even grow with or around the cages.
    deana

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  22. Great idea. I'm going to make some of these for my tomatoes. I plant to use sticks I trim off my trees and old baling twin so I don't have to buy anything. It's all recycles.

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  24. Carolyn: I'm impressed with your tomato cage. I don't think I'm as skilled and creative as you but I might give it a try. As far as the galvanized tub goes, what will you be using for drainage? Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much. The pots that the tomatoes were planted in were actual planters with drainage holes. Although, this year I plan to get larger pots. Thanks again!

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