Showing posts with label quinoa. Show all posts
Showing posts with label quinoa. Show all posts

Thursday, August 9, 2012

Good Taste: quinoa stuffed mushrooms


Quinoa Stuffed MushroomsIf you aren’t interested in quinoa then this is probably not the week for you here on homework since I sort of went crazy for quinoa this week. On Monday, I made Quinoa Tomato Salad Bites and since I made a little too much quinoa I used the extra to to make these stuffed mushrooms. You know how it is… you have to use up the leftovers.


Quinoa Stuffed MushroomsThis one I sort of made up as I went along using the classic bread crumb/parmesan cheese stuffed mushroom as a guide. The recipe is at the bottom of this post.


Quinoa Stuffed Mushrooms
To make these, start by washing and removing the stems from the mushrooms. You can cut off the stems or snap them off. Snapping them off is the preferred method because it leaves a nice cavity for your filling but you have to be careful not to crack your mushrooms. Once the stems are off, chop them up finely.

Cook the quinoa according to the package directions and set aside to cool. Mix together cream cheese, parmesan cheese, bread crumbs, basil and season with a little pepper. Add the cooked quinoa and mushroom stems.


Quinoa Stuffed Mushrooms
Stuff the mushroom caps with the quinoa mixture and drizzle with a little olive oil. Bake at 350 degrees for about 20 minutes or until the tops are golden brown and the cheese is melted.


Recipe Card Quinoa Stuffed MushroomsYou can download a PDF copy of the recipe here.

Quinoa Stuffed MushroomsYou can pretty much stuff mushrooms with anything as long as you have something gooey – like the cream cheese or parmesan cheese to hold it all together. I hope you enjoyed my experimentation with quinoa this week! It’s always fun to try something new.

Thanks for visiting.

Carolyn
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Monday, August 6, 2012

Good Taste: quinoa tomato salad bites


Quinoa Tomato Salad Bites
A few months ago I tried quinoa and really enjoyed it. You can see my quinoa pilaf post here and read all about the background and health benefits of quinoa. I’m experimenting with a few quinoa recipes and came up with a version of quinoa salad.


Quinoa Tomato Salad Bites
Little quinoa stuffed tomato salad bites. Don’t they look yummy? Here’s how I made them.


Quinoa Tomato Salad Bites
Start with cherry tomatoes. If you planted tomatoes a few months ago, you most likely have bushels of tomatoes right now. Slice off the tops and scoop out the seeds and pulp.


Quinoa Tomato Salad Bites
Make the quinoa according to the package directions and let cool. Add chopped basil and corn to the quinoa.


Quinoa Tomato Salad Bites
In a small bowl mix olive oil, lime juice, white wine vinegar, cumin and pepper. Add the the dressing to the quinoa mixture and gently stuff your tomatoes.


Quinoa Tomato Salad Bites
Tasty, refreshing and loaded with good stuff. 


Recipe Card Quinoa Tomato BitesYou can download a copy of the recipe here.



Quinoa Tomato Salad Bites
Use up that tomato harvest and whip up a batch for your next summer gathering! Yum!

Thanks for visiting.
Carolyn
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I link at the wonderful parties listed here 

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Good Taste: quinoa pilaf

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Quinoa Pilaf
Have you heard of or tried quinoa? I’ve seen a few recipes floating around but never thought to try it. When the nice people at Carapelli Extra Virgin Olive Oil sent me a recipe for quinoa pilaf and some of their wonderful extra virgin olive oil, I whipped up a batch.


Quinoa Pilaf
Here’s what quinoa looks like uncooked. I know… sort of like birdseed. The reason is that quinoa is actually a seed. Here’s what I found out about quinoa.

Over 5,000 years ago, high in the Andes mountains, the Incas began to cultivate quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) as one of their staple crops, believing that it gave power and stamina to their warriors. In the 1980s, two North Americans stumbled upon this ancient, super-nutritious food and began cultivating it near Boulder, Colorado. Since then, quinoa's popularity has exploded worldwide. 
 
Although it is cooked and eaten like a grain, quinoa is technically a seed, and is related to spinach, chard and beets. The seeds are round, about the same size of millet or sesame seeds, and come in a rainbow of colors, from red to purple to green to yellow, but the quinoa that is most commonly found in stores is an off-white color.
Source: Livestrong

 
Quinoa Pilaf
To make this quinoa pilaf, you start by washing the quinoa. You need to use a really fine strainer because those seeds are really little.


Recipe Card Quinoa
I made a printable recipe card with the recipe that Carapelli Olive Oil sent me in case you want to try making this dish. The recipe calls for leeks, sugar snap peas or shelled fresh peas, artichoke hearts and pine nuts. All of which I forgot to get at the grocery store.


Quinoa Pilaf
I improvised and used frozen peas, brown onions and toasted almonds and the results were wonderful. I wasn’t sure if I’d like quinoa but it was really good.
Here’s more information about quinoa:

Quinoa is a complete protein, which means that it contains all the amino acids necessary for our nutritional needs. Complete proteins are rare in the plant world, making quinoa an excellent food for vegetarians and vegans, or for anyone looking for healthy protein source. It's also high in iron and calcium, and is a good source of manganese, magnesium and copper, as well as fiber. Quinoa is naturally gluten-free, making it an excellent food for celiac patients or other people following a gluten-free diet. Quinoa flour is great for baking cookies, breads and muffins, and quinoa flakes are a perfect substitute for oatmeal.
Source: Livestrong


Quinoa Pilaf
Thank you so much Carapelli Olive Oil for challenging me to make and try something new.




Thanks for visiting.

Carolyn

I link at the wonderful parties listed here

I received samples in order to create this project but no monetary compensation. All opinions are 100% mine.